Harold Bring The Tub

We don’t think much of all technology we use on a daily basis and how technology has improved our lives. Has it always been this way? Of course not, our modern comfort is a direct result of the discomfort of past generations. However, no improvements would have happened if family kept up with the costume of having servants to light candles or tending fireplaces, warming up water to fill bath tubs, or emptying chamber pots.

As the industrial revolution started at the end of the 18th century England, domestic technology began to develop, but it developed slowly. Hard to believe a cabinetmaker started to fiddle with mechanical inventions and came up with what was known as the Bramah Valve Closet. Bramah invented a toilet bowl that would seal the water inside and prevent the cesspool from re-entering the room. A few country houses were fitted with the new piping technology system, the rest of the populations thought it was just a fad, so much that even by the late 1900s, many English aristocrats preferred the portable tubs brought to the bedroom for their weekly bath in front of the fireplace and the chamber pot remained close by in a corner of the bedroom, or in some households in the corner of the kitchen or dining room.

Above Feature Images: Copper Tub – Oil Bronze Finish – Approximately: $4,000.
(http://premiercopperproducts.com/catalog/product-cat/copper-bathtubs)

In some special period décor of today’s homes, stand-alone tubs are still used as show pieces, some have claw feet, some sit on the floor, but they all function with modern plumbing and we don’t call them portable anymore. We have become servant less and more confidently depending on technology.

large-Moen

The Moen’s ioDigital tub – http://www.moen.com/iodigital (watch the video, it will surprise you) allows the user to fill up the tub with a remote control as far as 30 feet away. large-Moen
The Moen’s ioDigital technology controls water to a desired temperature and volume, the device alerts when hot water runs low and tub overflows, it is also equipped with an anti-scalding feature and safety lock. The suggested retail price for the tub is around $1,200 less expensive than the stand-alone period copper tub (about $4,000) and around $2,500 for the “vertical spa” which includes rain shower head and body jets.

We sure have come a long way and in a very short time! Ciao,
Valentina

Copyright © 2013 Valentina Cirasola, All Rights Reserved

 

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